A Message From “The Family”: On Writer’s Block

typewriterMister Rand frequently experiences what he describes as “writer’s block,” an inability to summon up enthusiasm, words, images, or ideas for writing projects he has chosen to pursue. These difficulties plague many writers and do not issue from a single cause. Some of the causes of writer’s block include:

(1) Unwillingness to verbalize a distressing scene or idea, owing to the unpleasant feelings experiencing that scene or idea may bring up in one. This is more common than one might imagine. Writers, particularly fiction writers, frequently inhabit a mental world far more real to them than the outer, physical matrix in which they find their bodies lodged. As a result, they empathize with the sufferings of their thought-forms–their “characters”–as though these characters were flesh and blood creatures capable of suffering as physical entities are. The solution for this kind of writer’s block? As we see it, time. In time, the writer becomes so frustrated that he either abandons the project entirely, puts it on a shelf so to speak, or waits, staring at it, until it either comes back to life or dissipates.

(2) Devoting one’s attention to a character, plot, or idea whose time has not yet arrived.

Sometimes a writer’s unconscious self knows better than the conscious writer when is the proper time to continue a project that appears stalled. This is because creativity takes place in most cases on the unconscious level, and is “channeled”–brought into physical reality–by the author maintaining a daily routine of sharpening pencils, getting coffee, tidying the office, doodling, staring at the computer screen, and so forth. A character, plot, or idea’s time may not have arrived because the author may not have experienced or studied certain experiences or subjects that are crucial to the author’s spiritual, emotional, intellectual, and physical understanding of the character, plot, or idea in question…

(3) Pursuing a plot development because one feels one ought to rather than because one feels it is right for the piece. Sometimes a writer, having immersed him- or herself in trade magazines and best-seller lists, develops a nagging suspicion that the plot with which he or she is laboring will not hold readers’ interests sufficiently to earn the writer multiple sales, accolades, etc. And so the writer makes changes to the plot (or characters, or writing style) in order to accomodate the imagined audience. But the writer’s muse—his or her creative unconscious—does not approve of this change. It violates the original, compelling vision for the piece. And so the unconscious blocks forward progress in this arena.

(4) Overindulgence in sugary or carbohydrate-laden treats, lack of exercise, lack of social life, lack of self-confidence, lack of friends, lack of a life. Sometimes the writer’s block emerges from a general disgust with one’s state of being, or from physical factors seemingly unrelated to the creative process. High consumption of carbohydrates can damage the brain’s capacity to focus on the creative process. So can insufficient exercise, which inhibits blood flow to the brain. In addition, overemphasis on solitude or self-importance (“I Am A Writer”) or the self-importance of solitude (“I Need To Be By Myself For A While So I Can Focus Upon This Crucial Scene”) can make the unconscious say, “Give me a break, Mister Rand,” so that it shuts down in disgust. [This is a joke.] Also, lack of social stimulation can cause a similar rebellion in the unconscious mind.

(5) Right time, right place, right character, right plot, wrong stylistic approach or genre. Sometimes the writer’s block reflects the writer’s unconscious suspicion that his piece should be fictionalized memoir rather than, say, science fiction; or it reflects the writer’s need to abandon James Joycean prose filigrees in favor of a more standard grammatical and syntactical approach.

(6) Right idea, wrong writer. And occasionally, although the idea has merit, it is simply an idea floating around in Thought Reality seeking someone to express it in spacetime. And Mister Rand is not the correct choice for this. •

— Channeled July 2nd and 3rd, 2015

The Wheel of Creation: Harmony of Desire Hub

corridor_of_joyIf I want something and haven’t been able to create it in spacetime, chances are I have another goal I’m not admitting to, a goal that deep down I feel will be threatened if I succeed in the goal I am consciously attempting to achieve. In other words, I can block myself from fulfilling my conscious passion because I believe deep down I’m getting a more important benefit from not fulfilling it.

People with conflicting conscious and unconscious goals can’t focus energy clearly enough to manifest their desires as physical experience. The Hub of the Wheel of Creation, Harmony of Desire, teaches me the importance of listening to and acting from the heart, because it is only my true heart’s desires that I’ll feel will be worth the effort in the long run.

But what if it’s not a question of a primary heart’s desire in conflict with a secondary desire, but two primary heart’s desires in apparent conflict with one another? For example, let’s say that because of my abuse background one of my primary heart’s desires is to stay safe at any cost? And what if, at the same time, I long for deeply fulfilling intimate relationships? Unless I learn some special communication and self-care skills, I may find it difficult to maintain a feeling of emotional and sexual safety while at the same time negotiating the singles scene in order to find a suitable mate. Reconciling apparently conflicting primary heart’s desires is a chief task of the Wheel of Creation Hub.

Another chief Hub task is identifying consciously and specifically what my heart’s desires are. I call this Clarity of Vision. Many motivational programs, such as “The Secret”, focus upon this principle, which is based upon the idea that if I don’t know specifically what I wish to manifest, I will be unable to manifest it to my satisfaction. Fortunately, I have developed a tool for assisting in such clarifications. I call it the Ruling Passion Exercise.

Next: The Ruling Passion Exercise.

The Wheel of Creation

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My trance subpersona, “The Family,” cites The Wheel of Creation (originally channeled by my late partner Stuart Lucker) as a graphic, easy-to-follow, practical format for creating desired experience in Physical Reality. The Wheel is composed of six spokes and a hub, the principles, interrelationships, and criteria of all of which must be satisfied for a given dream to manifest. The spokes at the bottom of the Wheel as drawn represent the daily inner, emotional and mental work that must be done to make a given dream come true. These inward-focused spokes are Passion, Belief, and Strategy. The spokes at the top of the Wheel as drawn represent the daily outer, physical work that must be done to make a given dream come true. These outward-focused spokes are Action, Support, and Communication.

The hub at the center of the Wheel represents overall conditions that must be met for the inward- and outward-focused work to be truly effective. This hub bears two titles: Harmony of Desire and Clarity of Vision.

Many of my clients over the years have found the Wheel a useful tool for project planning and problem-solving, because it can be adapted to any situation. You can use the Wheel to find a job, plan a garden, write a novel, heal a wounded relationship, earn a degree, organize a family reunion, plot a course of addiction recovery, run a business, explore spirituality, and orchestrate a political action movement. You can also use the Wheel to figure out why projects, businesses, relationships, and other endeavors go wrong, or fail to satisfy when they go right. When I try my damnedest to achieve some particular goal, and fall short of doing so, it’s usually because I’ve failed to take into account one or more of the Wheel’s principles.

PRINCIPLE #1: PASSION
According to one view, everything exists because the Divine Heart of Love has a great passion to see Its uniqueness mirrored in an explosion of potentialities. You, I, and everything in this universe continually emerge from Love’s passionate dream of Itself; and that is why Passion is the bottom lefthand spoke on the Wheel of Creation.
In ordinary speech, “passion” is usually employed to mean strong feeling or desire. Bernard de Fontenelle wrote, “The passions in [people] are the winds necessary to put everything in motion” (Dialogues des morts, I, 1683), and it is true that, assuming all the principles of the Wheel are kept in balance, the more strongly one yearns to manifest a certain experience, the more likely one will do the hard work necessary to bring it to birth. But I do not use “passion” here simply as a synonym for “enthusiasm.” Emotions come and go, and the dreamer who depends upon feelings alone to carry him or her over the obstacles often encountered in the course of dream-manifestation will fail to stay the course. The kind of passion that brings new worlds into being is that intense inward focus that springs from complete inner investment in the project at hand. That is what I mean by the “passion” of the Passion Spoke.

The scientist who labors twenty-five years to find a cure for a fatal disease; the struggling artist who perseveres despite the mockery or indifference of critics; the single parent working two jobs to put children through college; the monastic devout who gets up to pray night after night, year after year — each is driven by complete commitment to seeing his or her dream realized, whether it be a dream of healing, of beauty, of love, or of divine union.
But commitment alone is not enough to make a dream come true… (NEXT: Belief)