A Message From “The Family”: On the Power of Belief

Mister Rand has asked us to share our perceptions of the power of belief to tweak probability lines and render some outcomes more probable than they might have been without the actions of belief upon them. Belief—which can be described, if not precisely defined, as [involving] emotional and intellectual investment in a specific [concept], person, cause, or positive [goal]—is often used interchangeably with the words “faith” rider_in_the_mistand “trust”. As we see things, however, belief is closer in meaning to a way of seeing the world that shapes expectations and provides a framework within which the believer interprets everything that happens.

There are some people, for example, who believe that if they ask their deity to provide them with a convenient parking place in a crowded or busy lot, that parking space will materialize almost at once. This belief is buttressed by those times when indeed a parking space does materialize within several minutes of the prayer. Those times when the parking space does not materialize are then interpreted according to the framework of the belief. So if the driver’s belief includes the belief that their God rewards them when they do something good and chastises them when they fail to do something good, the driver may conclude that the parking space did not materialize at once because the driver had done something to piss God off.

Or if the driver’s belief … includes the notion that their God is unconditionally loving, the driver can assume that, with a finite number of convenient parkings spaces available at any given moment, their God had denied our driver the parking space because God know that another driver… had a deeper and greater need for … the gift of the parking spot. Because the God knows the big picture, and knows that, in the most probable future available, if our second driver [had been] denied the parking spot [prayed for by] our first driver, a probability line would have come into being that, down the road a ways, might bring the second driver into disaster. In this way the first driver, who believes in an unconditionally loving deity, can console him- or herself that somehow the greater good was served by the desired parking spot going to somebody else.

Victorian_seanceMister Rand asks, “Can belief in a desired outcome draw to the believer a future in which that desired outcome is more probable? Or does a person’s beliefs have no power to affect probability lines unless the believer takes practical steps to make the desired future take place?” Mister Rand [refers to] the movie “The Secret”, which claims that if one believes strongly and vividly enough in a future where one’s deepest desires are satisfied, then that future is assuredly going to happen just as one hoped it would. Desire a bicycle? Pretend you already have it, [says “The Secret”]. Imagine as vividly as you can how the bicycle looks, how it feels under the hand, and how it makes you feel riding it. Do this long enough, and strongly enough, says “The Secret”, and the bicycle will come to you—possibly from an unexpected direction and with no further efforts on your part. “Does this visualization/manifestation technique really work?” asks Mister Rand.

Our answer to this is, sometimes it does, sometimes it doesn’t. But one can increase the likelihood of that bicycle materializing by bringing in at least three other persons who share one’s belief in “The Secret” technique. All four believers sitting together, praying for the same outcome or visualizing the same good fortune, often subtly tweaks a probability line so that the desired outcome does takes place.

According to our observations in the life of Mister Rand and the lives of those he has encountered, the more persons believe in a desired outcome, the more likely it will materialize, as long as certain conditions are met (see below).

If one brings in a faith circle to assist in the manifestation process, and still the desired outcome does not materialize, it may be because

  1. materializing the desired outcome might prove harmful to the believer or the greater good;
  2. there are additional actions the believer should take in order to position him- or herself to receive the desired outcome, actions which the believer might be reluctant to take because of fear, laziness, or pride;
  3. deep down the believer believes that he or she does not deserve to experience the desired outcome, and so unconsciously is blocking its manifestation;
  4. there is another outcome which the believer desires as much or more than the outcome the faith circle is attempting to materialize, and the materialization of one outcome would cancel out the likelihood of the other materializing;
  5. what the believer wants would, if manifested, violate the laws of spacetime;
  6. the mass consciousness of the faith group, family, or society in which the believer is embedded is bent on materializing a future incompatible with the outcome the believer desires;
  7. or a combination of the above factors.

Whatever the outcome, one can turn over the matter to Divine Love, which, being complete in Itself, desires only your good without thought of thanks, worship, or return. Ask questions, expect answers from any direction at the proper time, and your way through the dilemma will be made clear.

And we thank you for sharing. 

— Channeled February 3, 2017 by Rand Lee.

 

 

 

A Few Rules For A Rich Life (with Caveats)

  1. Get a job. If you can’t find one, make one up and go for it. If you can’t do this, volunteer. Volunteering often leads to paid jobs.
  2. Work your butt off. That is, throw yourself completely and enthusiastically into whatever you are doing.
  3. Rest frequently. Even a 5 minute eyes-closed phone-turned-off door-locked DO NOT DISTURB rest can refresh and heal you like nobody’s business.
  4. Cultivate your friendships. Gardens and friendships both require feeding, watering, weeding, and (occasionally) hard pruning in order to stay healthy.
  5. Don’t blame others for your mistakes. On the other hand, don’t blame yourself for your mistakes, either. Simply accept that you are human, and have made a mistake, and resolve to learn from it so your pain is not repeated.
  6. Notice, and release, “us-them” thinking wherever possible. 
  7. Don’t despair. It’s the nature of reality to change frequently, and there are no last chances for happiness even on your deathbed.
  8. Cultivate gratitude. However resentfully and reluctantly, make a conscious daily effort to notice at least one blessing in your life.
  9. Make a sincere effort, then release the need to control the results.
  10. Ask for what you really want, not what you think you can get.
  11. Budget.
  12. Make the most of the opportunities you have instead of wasting energy wishing you had better ones.
  13. Keep looking for better ones.
  14. Don’t lie, even when they do.
  15. Don’t sign anything you don’t understand. Don’t be ashamed to ask for explanations.
  16. Try to do as good a job in the small things as you do in the large.
  17. Don’t criticize others behind their backs. If you can’t find something good to say, hum.
  18. If in doubt about what decision to make, consider putting off the decision for 3 minutes, 3 hours, 3 days, 3 weeks, 3 months, or 3 years. By that time either the situation will have resolved itself, another opportunity will have arisen, or you will have been shown what to do.
  19. Keep your numbers. That is, keep track of how much money you earn and how much money you spend from day to day, so that at the end of the month you have a better idea of your spending patterns, and how to revise your budget in light of those patterns.
  20. Encourage the young, but don’t preach to them.
  21. When you make a mistake, ask, “What can I do differently next time?” The only failures are those who refuse to learn from failure.
  22. Exercise, however feebly. It soothes depression and sharpens the mind.
  23. Drink lots of water.
  24. Trust yourself.
  25. Don’t say “Yes” when you want to say “No”, and vice versa.
  26. Ask for help. Keep on asking as many sources as you can until you get that help you need.
  27. Don’t waste time worrying about your enemies. Divine Love and Truth will handle them if you let It, either by turning them into your friends or making their influence on your life irrelevant.
  28. Respect good teachers, but eschew guru-worship. No teacher or authority figure embodies Divine Love and Truth perfectly or completely.
  29. Relax. Tense muscles bruise easily, and so do tense minds and hearts.

 

The Wheel of Creation: Belief

ImageBelief—in the sense of trust or positive expectation—is, like passion, essential to any creative act. The word “belief” is ultimately derived from an ancient Indo-European root word meaning “to care, desire, love”, and the word “trust” from a root meaning “to be firm, solid, steadfast as a tree.”

If I wish to make a dream come true, I must trust that

(1) my dream is possible;

(2) my dream is possible for me; and

(3) that realizing my dream will not harm myself or another; and

(4) that I deserve my dream to come true as much as anybody does.

My belief must be strong enough to withstand apparent setbacks, as an oak tree weathers storms and blight. Learning such trust is not an overnight affair. It takes research: has anyone ever accomplished successfully something similar to what I dream of accomplishing? It takes self-inquiry: have I developed the skills necessary to do successfully what I dream of doing? If not, which skills do I lack? And it takes self-esteem: a reframing of past failures as part of a learning process that everyone undergoes at one time or another.

For spiritually inclined people, learning such trust also may require developing a concept of a completely accepting and supportive Greater Self (or Higher Power or Goddess or Invisible Sky Friend) that is as interested in my success as I am. 

I can have all the passion and belief in the world, however, but they will do me not a shred of good unless I also have a plan.

Next: Strategy.