Killing Mister Right

ImageI have, let’s be frank, spent much of my life waiting for Mister Right to come walking through my front door to sweep me off my feet. If my client notes are any indication, most of you secretly nurse an equivalent fantasy. Of the five top kinds of questions posed to me by clients—love, career, family, wellness, spiritual growth—love has always headed the list, ever since I started doing professional readings back in the 1980s.

Many clients are embarrassed to ask about love matters. They usually leave such queries for last, and pose them almost apologetically, even offhandedly, not wishing to appear too needy. “I suppose I may as well ask about my love life,” they say, or, “I guess everybody asks you this, right?” Well, yes. Everybody does. So stop being embarrassed. There are no stupid questions. (Actually, there is one stupid question: “So how’s your weight loss program going, Rand?” This is stupid because my answer is always the same: “Fine.” People who ask such questions deserve to be fibbed to.)

Underlying love questions is usually the hope, if not the belief, that there is somebody out there who is ideally suited to me, somebody I am fated to meet some day when I am truly ready. But what do I mean by “ideally suited”? Always sexually compatible? Always emotionally supportive? Always financially generous? Always intellectually stimulating? Always available for companionship activities? Always spiritually aware?

What I usually mean by “someone ideally suited to me” is “Someone who is wholly delightful to me at all times while being wholly supportive of me even at my worst.”

Now presumably, if such a person were my Mister Right, than I would be his. But can I honestly believe that I am capable of being wholly delightful and supportive to a partner at all times—even at my worst? I think not. And neither, I venture to say, can you.

The fact is, fantasies of Mister Right—or his sister, Ms. Right—are simply drugs to help us avoid learning to love real flawed people in real flawed life. So to paraphrase a Buddhist saying: When next you meet Mister Right on the road, kill him.

Welcome to The Rational Psychic

Welcome to my website! My name is Rand B. Lee. Since 1984 I’ve worked as a psychic consultant, helping clients around the U.S.A. and abroad explore a wide variety of issues: career, love, relationship, prosperity, spirituality, life-purpose, and many others. My clients hail from all walks of life. I give them readings over the telephone, on the Internet, via email, and in person. I use a variety of techniques to get information, including Tarot-reading and automatic speaking (which New Agers often call “channeling”). But whichever technique I employ, the goal is the same: to achieve purposive ego dissociation, a highly focused waking trance state.

When I am in trance, I become exceptionally sensitive to minute nuances of client voice tone, body language, and emotion. From them, I can get a lot of insight into the client’s psyche and behavior. Chatting with clients often triggers what I call “meme-bubbles”: sudden wellings-up of meaning-heavy images that string themselves out into linear speech when I open my mouth. Sometimes I feel presences around me or around the client. Sometimes I get detailed stories of past, parallel, or future event-sequences which present themselves as other lives the client has lived, is living, or will live. When I hit on information that seems especially important, the insight is usually accompanied by “truth chills”: a shivery feeling that goes up and down my spine, back, neck, and the base of my skull. In such cases my client often feels truth chills, too.

I’m telling you all this because I believe very strongly that most people—and many animals—possess some form of psychic ability. I am willing to bet that you do, too. So I’ve set up this blog site as a medium through which I can communicate my spiritual, metaphysical, and intuitive experiences to you, and to encourage you to do the same with me. But I must warn you: although I call myself a psychic, I am also a skeptic. I do not necessarily believe that all psychic experiences are supernatural in origin, and I am all too aware that many claims of amazing psychic powers are fraudulent. Those that are not fraudulent can often be attributed to conscious or unconscious reading of client tone, body language, and emotion, as I mention above. On the other hand, I am not a dyed-in-the-wool atheist or debunker. That’s why I call myself the Skeptical Psychic: because I believe that reason and intuition should be partners, not enemies. I see both as essential tools for navigating the uncertainties of life in physical reality.

So welcome to The Skeptical Psychic.
Over the next few months I hope you’ll find lots to think about here. And I very much look forward to hearing from you.