A Message from “The Family”: Soul Winter

Many individuals periodically undergo a transformational process characterized by a numbing of response to physical events and relationships. This process can be confused with depression, for they bear a certain likeness to one another: lassitude; lack of interest in recreational activities; a tendency to allow personal  cleanliness and grooming to languish. But the transformational process, which we call Soul Winter, goes far deeper than simple depression. It is a process whereby the soul decides whether or not to stay in physical reality.

The bulk of this process is not conscious. That is, the owner of the soul is usually unaware of the decision being weighed by his or her innermost self. But when the decision is finally made, the conscious self may be struck by a sense of urgency, a feeling that his or her time may be running out; or by a feeling of absolute certainty that nothing more can be accomplished or experienced in physical reality that would be worth the effort of doing so.

What happens when a soul decides it is time to shed the body and move on? Often, death takes place, and not necessarily by conscious suicide: an illness that has lain quiescent suddenly worsens; an accident sweeps the body away; another human, apparently randomly, causes the soul’s body to cease functioning. And sometimes the death comes by the soul’s own hand. This happened with Mr. Alex, Mr. Rand’s lover, who took an overdose of pain killer when he had decided that he did not wish the experience of a slow, painful death from AIDS.

Does this mean that every human who dies through illness, accident, suicide, or another’s violence decides to do so? No. Most individuals in those situations are not ready to die, and if they had the power to avert their deaths, they would do so readily. But individuals undergoing Soul Winter are different. Such individuals’ deaths take place after a lengthy process of disconnecting from spacetime, characterized by three stages: comprehensive life assessment; increasing detachment from relationships once treasured and activities once engaged in with joy; and, finally, a release of identification with career, loved ones, and body. Whereupon death usually comes quickly.

And that death can take two forms: physical death, culminating in the soul abandoning the body to the earth; or, more rarely, complete transformation of the personality, including all its passions, its purposes, and the focus of what it wishes to create and experience while still in the body. This latter experience of death while still in the body is often referred to as the “walk-in” experience, in which personality transformation is assumed to be caused by the original soul leaving the body and a different soul taking its place in the body.

While not ruling out the possibility that such a thing might conceivably take place, it is our observation that most cases classified as “walk-ins” do not involve a soul being replaced by a new one, but a soul maturing into its true life-purpose.

Mister Rand asks us why we have selected this topic to write about tonight. It is because the current upcoming winter season will be bringing many individuals into the process of assessing whether continuing in physical reality is worth doing in their present bodies and period of history. And we wish to make it known that suicide, whether conscious and deliberate or via apparently random accident, is not a sin which some God will punish. For God is Love in all parts of Itself, and thinks nothing of Itself, but only of Its creation, and how It can win Its children back into conscious union with It.

Mister Rand expresses fear that our saying this will encourage some readers to kill themselves. We do not expect that such a thing will happen, for most of the readers of this blog are interested in furthering their personal growth while still in the body. We say these things, rather, to offer consolation to any readers who may have lost a loved one to suicide. Your beloved is safe in the womb of the Celestial Mother, a womb so vast that all of physical reality might fit within it. And some day, when it is right, you will rejoin your beloved there.

And we thank you for sharing. •

— Channeled December 7, 2017, 1:04 A.M. U.S. Mountain Time.

 

 

A Message From “The Family”: On the Purpose of Things

MAJORTRUMPS.IX.TheFinalJudgmentIn the world of Thought, there is constant change. Thought forms are born, swell into importance, leave stains on the fabric of reality owing to the passions fueling them, and subside, becoming whispers on the winds that blow continually through the mental worlds of the  astral plane. Nobody asks, “What is the purpose of thoughts?” Thoughts come and go, arise and subside, give birth to other thoughts or to suspension thereof; Thought just is. Why, then, when speaking of  life in physical reality, do individuals seek obsessively for the purpose of such life? Is it not enough that  Life simply is; that seasons, like thought-forms, come and go; that love, death, birth, marriage, sickness, recovery, travel, fellowship, and creative endeavours simply arise and fall like waves of the ocean.

“Why am I here?” is one of Humanity’s great agonized cries. Yet as we see it from the Plane of Light and Sound, asking, “What is my life purpose?” is as meaningless as  “What is the purpose of the color blue?” Blue just is, that is all; life just is. That is to say, life is intrinsically valuable. It does not need a purpose, goal, or achievement to give it meaning and worth.

Mister Rand’s father was a world famous novelist at one point in human history. It is not what he set out to become, and he is virtually forgotten in America today. As we see things, what is important is not whether Mister Rand’s father had a great effect on human history, although in fact his work continues to resonate throughout the subgenre of literary entertainments known as crime fiction; but whether Mister Rand’s father enjoyed the experience. For it is the experience of hardness, softness, cold, heat, excitement, ennui, hate, love, redness, purpleness, travel, imprisonment that gives life its meaning and purpose.

By this thinking, therefore, there can be no such thing as failure. Mister Rand has frequently felt like a failure because he has not succeeded in becoming a famous writer like his father (he gives us permission to write this here, though he is not particularly happy about our having done so). But that very internal experience of self-disappointment, self-comparison, and self-appraisal is intrinsically valuable, because experience is growth, and growth is what all life seeks to embrace, whether in physical reality, thought reality, the physical planning state, the dream state, the nonphysical planning state, the plane of light and sound, the plane of the greater self, or the plane of the One.

“Why should the experience of growth be more valuable to the One,” asks Mister Rand, “than the experience of non-growth?” He asks this in order to make trouble for us <laughter>. All we can reply is, “Because it is.”

And we thank you for sharing. •