A Message From “The Family”: Why Psychic Readings Fail

When Mister Rand first began psychic work, it was because he sought specialness and meaning for his life. In college, he was very shy, and hung back from socializing, preferring the company of one or two friends, his books, and fantasies of finding the perfect mate. He was twenty years old.

In a bookshop he discovered the first Tarot deck he had ever seen, The Aquarian Tarot, an art nouveau deck of limited trance-inducing usefulness [for him] but of considerable graphic beauty. To the friends and girlfriends of dormitory acquaintances, Mister Rand gave readings for free, and he was surprised by the positive reactions he got from those he read for. “I assumed they were remembering the things that applied to them and forgetting all the many other things that didn’t,” Mister Rand says. He had no belief in a spiritual reality or in psychic ability.

We speak of these things now because, forty-six years later, Mister Rand is still pulled from one belief system to another. His many years of experience as a consulting intuitive have given him evidence after evidence that, while much of what passes for psychic accuracy can be attributed to (1) common sense, (2) conscious or unconscious body language and voice tone reading, or (3) accident, a significant percentage of each reading contains elements that cannot be easily attributed to chance. Why, then, do so many critics of the psychic process declare that no evidence exists for psychic ability or a spiritual reality?

We find it amusing that we are discussing this, given that, as “The Family,” we embody various information gathering vectors, most of them located in Mister Rand’s unconscious.

From our viewpoint, the human mind is a doorway into a multidimensional reality connected to probability lines; other selves in other lives; and the consciousnesses of animals, plants, and the Earth itself. The Greater Self of the individual human creates a reality in which that individual human can experience spacetime directly rather than via detached observation. And part of the experience of spacetime is a narrowing of focus in which the individual human’s awareness of the nonphysical retreats from waking consciousness. This is necessary because only in physical reality and thought reality can pain exist. Therefore the individual’s consciousness must be equipped to notice spacetime opportunities for nurturance and safety, so that pain is kept if possible to a minimum.

The great challenge, therefore, for an incarnated consciousness, is to keep enough of a focus on spacetime conditions and events that the physicalized body and mind can survive and thrive the various challenges that physical reality affords, while simultaneously develop and maintain enough of an awareness of, and access to, the nonphysical realities that hope, consolation, wonder, and Divine Love may serve as tools and framing mechanisms for the individual’s spacetime experiences.

As your quantum physicists are discovering, atomic particles and processes, when observed by a human consciousness, behave differently than when they are observed by a mechanism. On the macrocosmic level, this process manifests for psychics as a shifting variability of successful psychic insight conditional upon not only the skill and detachment of the psychic reader, but also upon the willingness of the experimenter or scientific observer to allow for an expansion of his or her belief systems. In other words, Mister Rand cannot read anyone who, consciously or unconsciously, does not wish the experiment to succeed, either because of intellectual bias; a fear of being penetrated and violated by another’s consciousness; a fear of the information the reader comes up with; or emotional prejudice against “New Age” practices.

Mister Rand says to us, “Do you mean to claim that all experimenters and scientific observers participating in unsuccessful psychic experiments are biased against objective results?” We do not claim this. For there is another vector involved in failed attempts to read a subject, and that is the reader’s fear of those he or she is reading for. Mister Rand has found that if he is afraid of possible negative repercussions of participating in a reading, his fear will shut down the objective detachment necessary for a reading to succeed.

Mister Rand has experienced public humiliation as a result of a reading experiment before an audience containing significant numbers of individuals hostile to the reality of psychic abilities, and the shock of finding he could not pick up any information from those in the audience nearly caused  him to quit his psychic work entirely.

Sexual attraction to the one being read can also block a successful reading. •

Channeled November 4, 2017 by Rand B. Lee

A Message From “The Family”: On the Purpose of Things

MAJORTRUMPS.IX.TheFinalJudgmentIn the world of Thought, there is constant change. Thought forms are born, swell into importance, leave stains on the fabric of reality owing to the passions fueling them, and subside, becoming whispers on the winds that blow continually through the mental worlds of the  astral plane. Nobody asks, “What is the purpose of thoughts?” Thoughts come and go, arise and subside, give birth to other thoughts or to suspension thereof; Thought just is. Why, then, when speaking of  life in physical reality, do individuals seek obsessively for the purpose of such life? Is it not enough that  Life simply is; that seasons, like thought-forms, come and go; that love, death, birth, marriage, sickness, recovery, travel, fellowship, and creative endeavours simply arise and fall like waves of the ocean.

“Why am I here?” is one of Humanity’s great agonized cries. Yet as we see it from the Plane of Light and Sound, asking, “What is my life purpose?” is as meaningless as  “What is the purpose of the color blue?” Blue just is, that is all; life just is. That is to say, life is intrinsically valuable. It does not need a purpose, goal, or achievement to give it meaning and worth.

Mister Rand’s father was a world famous novelist at one point in human history. It is not what he set out to become, and he is virtually forgotten in America today. As we see things, what is important is not whether Mister Rand’s father had a great effect on human history, although in fact his work continues to resonate throughout the subgenre of literary entertainments known as crime fiction; but whether Mister Rand’s father enjoyed the experience. For it is the experience of hardness, softness, cold, heat, excitement, ennui, hate, love, redness, purpleness, travel, imprisonment that gives life its meaning and purpose.

By this thinking, therefore, there can be no such thing as failure. Mister Rand has frequently felt like a failure because he has not succeeded in becoming a famous writer like his father (he gives us permission to write this here, though he is not particularly happy about our having done so). But that very internal experience of self-disappointment, self-comparison, and self-appraisal is intrinsically valuable, because experience is growth, and growth is what all life seeks to embrace, whether in physical reality, thought reality, the physical planning state, the dream state, the nonphysical planning state, the plane of light and sound, the plane of the greater self, or the plane of the One.

“Why should the experience of growth be more valuable to the One,” asks Mister Rand, “than the experience of non-growth?” He asks this in order to make trouble for us <laughter>. All we can reply is, “Because it is.”

And we thank you for sharing. •