A Message From “The Family”: On Accepting Change In Physical Reality

MAJORTRUMPS.XIV.TheBoltMr Rand has asked us why it is so hard for him to accept change when it occurs in physical reality. We reply that it is because you [originally] come from a [nonphysical] reality where nothing changes; or at least, nothing changes in such a way as to cause pain and torment. In [physical] reality everything is constantly changing, sometimes slowly, sometimes quickly; and whether this change is experienced in pain, neutrality or pleasure depends upon the physical forces involved (physical reality has hard edges) and the viewpoint of the organism being subjected to the change. To an ant living in the yard outside Mr Rand’s door, Mr Rand is one of the changeless experiences of that ant. The ant lives life so quickly, and its life is so brief compared to human lives, that generations of ants may experience Mr Rand over the course of a few years.

Animals accept change because animals are unable to do things with their hands as well as humans can (with some exceptions, such as certain birds and pongids). So animals by and large do not labor under the assumption that they can control anything much except access to their foodstores or foodgathering territory. Animals have a sense of purpose and a sense of time, but these too are very different from the human sense of purpose and time. An animal’s sense of purpose is, firstly, survival of its young; and secondly, survival of itself. So animals do not have great plans that they feel they must protect.

Mr Rand asks, why is accepting change so difficult for me? And we reply, as we see it, you fear change because you fear you will lose access to Love. But Love is always available. Love is the core of everything, and surrounds everything, and is complete in itself so it needs nothing back. It simply loves. So ultimately, everyone and everything is safe.

But bodies are not safe in physical reality. Disease, damage, death all threaten human bodies, and animal ones, too. Physical reality is the one reality in which the experiment of individuation necessitates the human psyche be able to pretend that [1] the nonphysical does not exist and that [2] the Divine Womb is a fantasy of nincompoops and emotionals. [An individual in physical reality] struggles against change because all changes, however minor, remind us that in physical reality, nothing stays the same for long, including the human body and the human brain and the individual soul’s investment in an individual life incarnation. And you would not be in physical reality if you did not have experiences here that you desired [when you were] in the nonphysical.

Understand we speak in human time terms here. From the viewpoint of the nonphysical, time is not linear. There is no before or after, I am [or] I am not, past or future, love or hate in the human sense, success or failure; in the nonphysical, awareness of Divine Love is constantly available and even obvious to the individual soul, as witness the fact that when Mister Rand had his visions of agapé (love) last fall, the Divine Lover felt familiar, like an old friend whom he had forgotten was and always had been and always would be “standing right behind my left shoulder,” as it were.

sow_mother_and_child copySo attachment to one’s goal of expanding one’s experience is needed if one is to approach fulfilling that goal in a spacetime context. Spacetime contains entropy, the force that brings all moving things eventually to rest. Everything that rises must converge. Everything in motion must eventually find rest. Everything living must eventually die and be returned to its undifferentiated state of We not I. So the human soul must struggle to stay focused in physical reality. Attachment of the ego to a spacetime experience is therefore a tool useful for the soul to stay focused enough in spacetime that its pains will not stop it from the experiences that soul needs. [RAND: The ego keeps us in physical reality long enough for us to fulfill the experiences we selected when we were in the nonphysical.]

The human body knows spirit, but on a level that is not usually readily accessible by human consciousness. For humans, the body behaves as though all it knows is physical existence. So to the body, physical reality is all that exists. Much of the pain of physical reality comes from natural disasters such as earthquakes and climate changes, but many changes are caused by humans themselves in their efforts to find ultimate contentment, safety, and nurture. To find these things in a physical context, embodied souls tend to seek power over reality, rather than the more useful approach: that of seeking cooperation with reality.

[NEXT: How to cooperate with physical reality.]

A Message From “The Family”: On Hope

ImageWhen a child is born into physical reality, from a psychological perspective it has no hope or despair, for it is aware only of the present moment and the universe of itself.  When a child “hopes for” something, it is not hope that one speaks of, but desire: craving, wish, longing, which all humans possess from inception. If it were not so–if the human infant did not feel and communicate its cravings–it might well die before its caregivers, or those around it, noticed it needed anything. The same is true of dogs and cats and other domestic animals. At birth they live in the present, and their internal lives are characterized by desire: for the warmth of the body of the caregiver; for the milk the caregiver provides, or other sustenance; and for the chance to exercise, play, and learn from their environment and peers.

Hope and despair become conscious emotions or experiences when the child reaches the age when its brain is sufficiently developed for it to be aware of the passage of time, and when it is able to distinguish between self and others. This may take place [by] the age of 8 in many cases. This is why little children were able to play even in concentration camps. Fatigue, exhaustion, and terror were all available to them, but not despair as such, although they could become afraid and depressed at the despair of the adults around them.

We mention these things because to understand hope one must understand  that hope, like despair, arise when one achieves the maturity to sense boundaries to gratification and also the possibility of a positive or negative outcome in time. God, for instance, does not hope, because God is outside of time, and is complete in Itself, of Whom It considers you a particle. God knows that Love is Its nature in all parts of Itself, including you; and that on the divine level,  Love is never defeated or denied. Therefore It need have no anxiety about the future or regret about the past. Amor vincit omnia: love conquers all resistance eventually. Eventually, everyone who has turned its back upon Love will be wooed back into Its arms (we speak figuratively of course).

What, then, is hope, and how does one attain and maintain an attitude of hope when one is beleaguered by unpleasant or discouraging circumstances?

On the Wheel of Creation, Mr Rand and Mr Alex’s template for manifestation in physical reality, hope is allied with belief. To increase belief (in positive outcome, in the eventual victory of Love over all resistance to It) one must look across the center of the Wheel, across the hub called Harmony of Desire, to the spoke opposite that of belief: the support spoke. Put simply, if you lack hope, it is because you lack a sense of support for your longed for condition or goal. To increase hope, therefore, it is necessary to increase one’s sense of support.

How does one do this, particularly when one is discouraged or depressed? . . . By seeking out those who share similar beliefs to your own: similar values, similar cultural backgrounds, similar mindsets, similar thought processes, similar interests and experiences. As support grows, so does belief that positive outcome is possible.

A basic principle in physical reality is that it is extremely difficult to find hope without interaction with other sentient beings. In short, it is very very difficult to climb out of despair alone, or in isolation (though not impossible if one has already developed a rich sense of Divine Love and a habit for dialoguing with It). Twelve Step recovery programs work in part because they offer addicted individuals the hope that, if they work the introspective and self-revelatory meditative exercises expressed in the Twelve Steps, and find a sponsor and attend regular meetings with others like themselves, they will find relief from addiction. For it is a fact that despair can become an addiction: a habituated pattern of emotional response to life that is driven not necessarily by present difficulties, dramatic though they may be, but by the brain having become so drenched in force, threat, and blame in the past that it cannot right the chemical imbalances created by such drenching.

WheelofCreationTo lift one’s brain out of despair-drenching, one must begin by accepting that one is trapped in despair with a desire to learn from the experience. Then one must begin asking questions: How did I get into my present situation? What actions or inactions did I perform, and what strategies did I use, to create or fall prey to my present difficulties? By coming to grips with the physical and psychological processes that led to the choices that have led to one’s force-threat-blame experiences, one then must begin inquiring into whether there are deeper forces at work—spiritual, intellectual, or evaluative patterns that are feeding into one’s despair. If one asks and keeps on asking for enlightenment on this issue, one will certainly be rewarded with an answer or answers. And the answer or answers discovered will contain within them clues as to how one may escape from, or work with, the present difficulty that has led one to give up hope.

When light begins to dawn, and one begins to see the reasons physical and spiritual behind one’s difficulties, one must then commit oneself to finding the path of Love through one’s difficulties. How can I learn to love myself given the choices I have made? How can I learn to love my enemies to the extent to which they will allow and without violating myself in the process? Taking these questions to one’s Greater Self, and to one’s support systems (friends, family, doctors, counselors, teachers and so forth), one will eventually come up with a plan of action the sole purpose of which is to find the most direct route to giving myself the solace, information, help and resources [I need] to change [my] difficult circumstance into one that is more life-affirming. For some persons (and some circumstances), science yields clues to the most direct route to harmony. For others, philosophy or religion; and for still others, the taking of practical physical action to find support for the next step in one’s strategy for self-rescue; or a combination of the utilizations of all these tools.

And we thank you for sharing. •

— Channeled 17 January 2014, 5:20pm MT, by Rand Lee. All rights reserved. Edited 23 January 2014.

The Wheel of Creation: Harmony of Desire Hub

corridor_of_joyIf I want something and haven’t been able to create it in spacetime, chances are I have another goal I’m not admitting to, a goal that deep down I feel will be threatened if I succeed in the goal I am consciously attempting to achieve. In other words, I can block myself from fulfilling my conscious passion because I believe deep down I’m getting a more important benefit from not fulfilling it.

People with conflicting conscious and unconscious goals can’t focus energy clearly enough to manifest their desires as physical experience. The Hub of the Wheel of Creation, Harmony of Desire, teaches me the importance of listening to and acting from the heart, because it is only my true heart’s desires that I’ll feel will be worth the effort in the long run.

But what if it’s not a question of a primary heart’s desire in conflict with a secondary desire, but two primary heart’s desires in apparent conflict with one another? For example, let’s say that because of my abuse background one of my primary heart’s desires is to stay safe at any cost? And what if, at the same time, I long for deeply fulfilling intimate relationships? Unless I learn some special communication and self-care skills, I may find it difficult to maintain a feeling of emotional and sexual safety while at the same time negotiating the singles scene in order to find a suitable mate. Reconciling apparently conflicting primary heart’s desires is a chief task of the Wheel of Creation Hub.

Another chief Hub task is identifying consciously and specifically what my heart’s desires are. I call this Clarity of Vision. Many motivational programs, such as “The Secret”, focus upon this principle, which is based upon the idea that if I don’t know specifically what I wish to manifest, I will be unable to manifest it to my satisfaction. Fortunately, I have developed a tool for assisting in such clarifications. I call it the Ruling Passion Exercise.

Next: The Ruling Passion Exercise.

The Wheel of Creation

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My trance subpersona, “The Family,” cites The Wheel of Creation (originally channeled by my late partner Stuart Lucker) as a graphic, easy-to-follow, practical format for creating desired experience in Physical Reality. The Wheel is composed of six spokes and a hub, the principles, interrelationships, and criteria of all of which must be satisfied for a given dream to manifest. The spokes at the bottom of the Wheel as drawn represent the daily inner, emotional and mental work that must be done to make a given dream come true. These inward-focused spokes are Passion, Belief, and Strategy. The spokes at the top of the Wheel as drawn represent the daily outer, physical work that must be done to make a given dream come true. These outward-focused spokes are Action, Support, and Communication.

The hub at the center of the Wheel represents overall conditions that must be met for the inward- and outward-focused work to be truly effective. This hub bears two titles: Harmony of Desire and Clarity of Vision.

Many of my clients over the years have found the Wheel a useful tool for project planning and problem-solving, because it can be adapted to any situation. You can use the Wheel to find a job, plan a garden, write a novel, heal a wounded relationship, earn a degree, organize a family reunion, plot a course of addiction recovery, run a business, explore spirituality, and orchestrate a political action movement. You can also use the Wheel to figure out why projects, businesses, relationships, and other endeavors go wrong, or fail to satisfy when they go right. When I try my damnedest to achieve some particular goal, and fall short of doing so, it’s usually because I’ve failed to take into account one or more of the Wheel’s principles.

PRINCIPLE #1: PASSION
According to one view, everything exists because the Divine Heart of Love has a great passion to see Its uniqueness mirrored in an explosion of potentialities. You, I, and everything in this universe continually emerge from Love’s passionate dream of Itself; and that is why Passion is the bottom lefthand spoke on the Wheel of Creation.
In ordinary speech, “passion” is usually employed to mean strong feeling or desire. Bernard de Fontenelle wrote, “The passions in [people] are the winds necessary to put everything in motion” (Dialogues des morts, I, 1683), and it is true that, assuming all the principles of the Wheel are kept in balance, the more strongly one yearns to manifest a certain experience, the more likely one will do the hard work necessary to bring it to birth. But I do not use “passion” here simply as a synonym for “enthusiasm.” Emotions come and go, and the dreamer who depends upon feelings alone to carry him or her over the obstacles often encountered in the course of dream-manifestation will fail to stay the course. The kind of passion that brings new worlds into being is that intense inward focus that springs from complete inner investment in the project at hand. That is what I mean by the “passion” of the Passion Spoke.

The scientist who labors twenty-five years to find a cure for a fatal disease; the struggling artist who perseveres despite the mockery or indifference of critics; the single parent working two jobs to put children through college; the monastic devout who gets up to pray night after night, year after year — each is driven by complete commitment to seeing his or her dream realized, whether it be a dream of healing, of beauty, of love, or of divine union.
But commitment alone is not enough to make a dream come true… (NEXT: Belief)