A Message from “The Family”: A Threefold Approach to Fear Mitigation

Mister Rand has been experiencing a great deal of anxiety concerning the fate of gay half-Jewish psychics like himself under the present political system. While to an observer this may seem a dread unlikely to be fulfilled due to the specificity of its parameters, Mister Rand’s fears are generated not by reason but by memory:

  • Mister Rand’s memory of his secular Jewish father’s dread of antisemitic persecution;
  • Mister Rand’s memory of persecution at the hands of his abused and abusive older brother;
  • A memory of the sense of Otherness which caused Mister Rand to hang back from full involvement with life from an early age; and
  • The memory of other incarnations to which he is linked on a spirit and soul level.

mercy

The multidimensionality of persistent, fearful life outlook cannot be ignored without sometimes severe repercussions in the life of the fearful one. In our observations of human existence, it appears to us that the best approach to take for clearing the soul of such limitations is an approach that employs physical, psychological, and perceptual tools in more or less equal measure.

Physical, because the neuromuscular systems bear their own memories of pain inflicted upon them in the sometimes deep past, pain that can respond well to empathic bodywork, tension-relieving exercise, dietary changes, deep breathing, progressive relaxation, sexual play, and certain medications;

Psychological, because even the most rational humans, contemptuous or dismissive of such notions as Inner Child, Inner Parent, and intergenerational trauma transmission, can respond positively to mental fear-mitigation practices such as therapeutic mentorship, mindfulness training, support group involvement, and journaling; 

Perceptual, because the way one views reality can have stress-relieving, stress-inducing, or numbing effects on the sufferer, depending upon the world-view adopted.

(Mister Rand is somewhat embarrassed by our discussing his vulnerabilities so publicly. We remind him, however, that he has complete control of what we say and how it is disseminated. We further remind him that, as his neglect of this blog has allowed his followers and their “hits” to dwindle to almost nothing, it is highly unlikely that what he writes here will spread like wildfire across public media.)

Next Time:  Fear mitigation exercise #1 — Identifying the fears that rule you.

A Message From “The Family”: On Hope

ImageWhen a child is born into physical reality, from a psychological perspective it has no hope or despair, for it is aware only of the present moment and the universe of itself.  When a child “hopes for” something, it is not hope that one speaks of, but desire: craving, wish, longing, which all humans possess from inception. If it were not so–if the human infant did not feel and communicate its cravings–it might well die before its caregivers, or those around it, noticed it needed anything. The same is true of dogs and cats and other domestic animals. At birth they live in the present, and their internal lives are characterized by desire: for the warmth of the body of the caregiver; for the milk the caregiver provides, or other sustenance; and for the chance to exercise, play, and learn from their environment and peers.

Hope and despair become conscious emotions or experiences when the child reaches the age when its brain is sufficiently developed for it to be aware of the passage of time, and when it is able to distinguish between self and others. This may take place [by] the age of 8 in many cases. This is why little children were able to play even in concentration camps. Fatigue, exhaustion, and terror were all available to them, but not despair as such, although they could become afraid and depressed at the despair of the adults around them.

We mention these things because to understand hope one must understand  that hope, like despair, arise when one achieves the maturity to sense boundaries to gratification and also the possibility of a positive or negative outcome in time. God, for instance, does not hope, because God is outside of time, and is complete in Itself, of Whom It considers you a particle. God knows that Love is Its nature in all parts of Itself, including you; and that on the divine level,  Love is never defeated or denied. Therefore It need have no anxiety about the future or regret about the past. Amor vincit omnia: love conquers all resistance eventually. Eventually, everyone who has turned its back upon Love will be wooed back into Its arms (we speak figuratively of course).

What, then, is hope, and how does one attain and maintain an attitude of hope when one is beleaguered by unpleasant or discouraging circumstances?

On the Wheel of Creation, Mr Rand and Mr Alex’s template for manifestation in physical reality, hope is allied with belief. To increase belief (in positive outcome, in the eventual victory of Love over all resistance to It) one must look across the center of the Wheel, across the hub called Harmony of Desire, to the spoke opposite that of belief: the support spoke. Put simply, if you lack hope, it is because you lack a sense of support for your longed for condition or goal. To increase hope, therefore, it is necessary to increase one’s sense of support.

How does one do this, particularly when one is discouraged or depressed? . . . By seeking out those who share similar beliefs to your own: similar values, similar cultural backgrounds, similar mindsets, similar thought processes, similar interests and experiences. As support grows, so does belief that positive outcome is possible.

A basic principle in physical reality is that it is extremely difficult to find hope without interaction with other sentient beings. In short, it is very very difficult to climb out of despair alone, or in isolation (though not impossible if one has already developed a rich sense of Divine Love and a habit for dialoguing with It). Twelve Step recovery programs work in part because they offer addicted individuals the hope that, if they work the introspective and self-revelatory meditative exercises expressed in the Twelve Steps, and find a sponsor and attend regular meetings with others like themselves, they will find relief from addiction. For it is a fact that despair can become an addiction: a habituated pattern of emotional response to life that is driven not necessarily by present difficulties, dramatic though they may be, but by the brain having become so drenched in force, threat, and blame in the past that it cannot right the chemical imbalances created by such drenching.

WheelofCreationTo lift one’s brain out of despair-drenching, one must begin by accepting that one is trapped in despair with a desire to learn from the experience. Then one must begin asking questions: How did I get into my present situation? What actions or inactions did I perform, and what strategies did I use, to create or fall prey to my present difficulties? By coming to grips with the physical and psychological processes that led to the choices that have led to one’s force-threat-blame experiences, one then must begin inquiring into whether there are deeper forces at work—spiritual, intellectual, or evaluative patterns that are feeding into one’s despair. If one asks and keeps on asking for enlightenment on this issue, one will certainly be rewarded with an answer or answers. And the answer or answers discovered will contain within them clues as to how one may escape from, or work with, the present difficulty that has led one to give up hope.

When light begins to dawn, and one begins to see the reasons physical and spiritual behind one’s difficulties, one must then commit oneself to finding the path of Love through one’s difficulties. How can I learn to love myself given the choices I have made? How can I learn to love my enemies to the extent to which they will allow and without violating myself in the process? Taking these questions to one’s Greater Self, and to one’s support systems (friends, family, doctors, counselors, teachers and so forth), one will eventually come up with a plan of action the sole purpose of which is to find the most direct route to giving myself the solace, information, help and resources [I need] to change [my] difficult circumstance into one that is more life-affirming. For some persons (and some circumstances), science yields clues to the most direct route to harmony. For others, philosophy or religion; and for still others, the taking of practical physical action to find support for the next step in one’s strategy for self-rescue; or a combination of the utilizations of all these tools.

And we thank you for sharing. •

— Channeled 17 January 2014, 5:20pm MT, by Rand Lee. All rights reserved. Edited 23 January 2014.

On Fear: A Message from “The Family”

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Fear is the nursemaid of hate. Fear is the child of understanding only part of the whole picture. Fear is the lover of anger; each feeds the other. Fear, as one of your science fiction writers has stated, is the mind killer. Why, if the multiverse arose from a Void of Love and Light, does fear play a part in physical reality?

Fear is necessary in physical reality because (1) incarnated consciousnesses possess finite brains that find it very difficult to encompass a full understanding of the Greater Self, in whom we are each ever and always safe; (2) because beings with physical bodies need biochemical assistance in order to survive in the everchanging reality of hardedged spacetime; and (3) because physical reality is a young reality that is still learning about itself. This is how we see it.

Mr Rand’s fears are always the same: fear of falling down a bottomless well, in the dark, where no cries can be heard and where no love penetrates, forever and ever. This translates into such lesser fears as fear of poverty, fear of low status, fear of abuse, fear of humiliation, fear of death. But in fact Mr Rand’s fears boil down to fear of abandonment by the Divine Lover of souls.

 

The fact that such abandonment cannot and will not ever happen to Mr Rand is beside the point. The physical brain lays down channels of information processing as it ages, and Mr Rand’s fear channels are well laid down. To balance such learned fear, it is useful to begin laying down new neural pathways of trust and love. And this is best done through a combination of meditation, emotional expression, and physical action.

By meditation we do not necessarily mean formal meditation as practiced in various of your religions, although all such practices have merit in reducing fear. Meditation can be as simple a practice as sitting in the chair and feeling the sunshine warm your skin while you sing a lovely song to yourself. Or lying on the soil and feeling it beneath your feet and hands and knees; smelling it; hugging the earth and imagining yourself as an infant lying upon the chest of your loving parent. Meditation is any practice that takes you out of your focus upon past or future, for that is what fear is: expectations of pain born from past experience, or expectations of pain born from the fears of those around you.

Talking to oneself can also reduce fear. Saying, “I accept that this is how I feel at this moment,” and focusing upon the fear, gently softening around the fear (rather than distracting yourself from the fear through food, television, alcohol, and such diversions) so that it begins to recede. Saying to oneself, “Today I have food, clothing, a place to shelter from the elements, friends, and a sweet black cat named Urdwill” can help bring one’s attention back into the present, where it belongs.

This is not to say that planning for the future is bad. Fear can be a sign that your bodymind knows there are repercussions about to be experienced by you as a result of your failure to plan. But it is important to bear in mind that physical reality always contains within it the element of chance (The Fool in the Tarot deck), and that ultimately no one can control all the events of a life.

So what can one do to live peacefully in a world where pain, sorrow, and grief can exist? One way that is often avoided by Mr Rand is the way of physical consolation. Putting on music, soaking in a bathtub, receiving a massage, asking for a hug, creating beauty through making art or digging in the garden, taking a gentle swim in a public pool until one’s body is pleasantly fatigued—all these actions can help reduce fear, depending upon the forms your fear takes and the surroundings and events that tend to trigger it.

One of the worst aspects of anxiety attacks is the sense that one is completely alone. Yet independence was never the plan for physical reality. Even in the great light reaches, such as the plane of reality we call the plane of light and sound, independence is not possible. The way of creation on all planes is interdependence—asking and receiving; loving and being loved; giving and getting; communicating one’s needs to others until one’s needs are met. Your Jesus said, “Ask and keep on asking and you will receive. Seek and keep on seeking and you will find. Knock and keep on knocking and the door will be opened.” That is how he spoke in the Aramaic of his day, and that is how the Greek writers of the New Testament wrote down his words.