A Message From “The Family”: Why Psychic Readings Fail

When Mister Rand first began psychic work, it was because he sought specialness and meaning for his life. In college, he was very shy, and hung back from socializing, preferring the company of one or two friends, his books, and fantasies of finding the perfect mate. He was twenty years old.

In a bookshop he discovered the first Tarot deck he had ever seen, The Aquarian Tarot, an art nouveau deck of limited trance-inducing usefulness [for him] but of considerable graphic beauty. To the friends and girlfriends of dormitory acquaintances, Mister Rand gave readings for free, and he was surprised by the positive reactions he got from those he read for. “I assumed they were remembering the things that applied to them and forgetting all the many other things that didn’t,” Mister Rand says. He had no belief in a spiritual reality or in psychic ability.

We speak of these things now because, forty-six years later, Mister Rand is still pulled from one belief system to another. His many years of experience as a consulting intuitive have given him evidence after evidence that, while much of what passes for psychic accuracy can be attributed to (1) common sense, (2) conscious or unconscious body language and voice tone reading, or (3) accident, a significant percentage of each reading contains elements that cannot be easily attributed to chance. Why, then, do so many critics of the psychic process declare that no evidence exists for psychic ability or a spiritual reality?

We find it amusing that we are discussing this, given that, as “The Family,” we embody various information gathering vectors, most of them located in Mister Rand’s unconscious.

From our viewpoint, the human mind is a doorway into a multidimensional reality connected to probability lines; other selves in other lives; and the consciousnesses of animals, plants, and the Earth itself. The Greater Self of the individual human creates a reality in which that individual human can experience spacetime directly rather than via detached observation. And part of the experience of spacetime is a narrowing of focus in which the individual human’s awareness of the nonphysical retreats from waking consciousness. This is necessary because only in physical reality and thought reality can pain exist. Therefore the individual’s consciousness must be equipped to notice spacetime opportunities for nurturance and safety, so that pain is kept if possible to a minimum.

The great challenge, therefore, for an incarnated consciousness, is to keep enough of a focus on spacetime conditions and events that the physicalized body and mind can survive and thrive the various challenges that physical reality affords, while simultaneously develop and maintain enough of an awareness of, and access to, the nonphysical realities that hope, consolation, wonder, and Divine Love may serve as tools and framing mechanisms for the individual’s spacetime experiences.

As your quantum physicists are discovering, atomic particles and processes, when observed by a human consciousness, behave differently than when they are observed by a mechanism. On the macrocosmic level, this process manifests for psychics as a shifting variability of successful psychic insight conditional upon not only the skill and detachment of the psychic reader, but also upon the willingness of the experimenter or scientific observer to allow for an expansion of his or her belief systems. In other words, Mister Rand cannot read anyone who, consciously or unconsciously, does not wish the experiment to succeed, either because of intellectual bias; a fear of being penetrated and violated by another’s consciousness; a fear of the information the reader comes up with; or emotional prejudice against “New Age” practices.

Mister Rand says to us, “Do you mean to claim that all experimenters and scientific observers participating in unsuccessful psychic experiments are biased against objective results?” We do not claim this. For there is another vector involved in failed attempts to read a subject, and that is the reader’s fear of those he or she is reading for. Mister Rand has found that if he is afraid of possible negative repercussions of participating in a reading, his fear will shut down the objective detachment necessary for a reading to succeed.

Mister Rand has experienced public humiliation as a result of a reading experiment before an audience containing significant numbers of individuals hostile to the reality of psychic abilities, and the shock of finding he could not pick up any information from those in the audience nearly caused  him to quit his psychic work entirely.

Sexual attraction to the one being read can also block a successful reading. •

Channeled November 4, 2017 by Rand B. Lee

Fools rush in where angels fear to tread

Rand_holding_light     I’ve worked as a psychic in Santa Fe and nationwide for many years. Around 20 years ago I was invited to attend a local skeptics conference. I was interested because I had long thought intuition and reason are both crucial to a balanced understanding of psychophysical phenomena, and I had been yearning to find a group that honestly and without bias investigated paranormal claims, experiences, and practices. To me a “skeptic” was an honest seeker of truth, in contrast to a “debunker,” an ideologue whose mind had already been made up, and whose purpose was to reveal as fake or erroneous a practitioner and his or her practices.
     When I arrived at the conference I sat with my host in the audience. The leader of the conference, a distinguished looking academic type, called the meeting to order and introduced me as the guest speaker. I politely informed him that I had not been told I was the guest speaker; I thought I had been invited as just another attender and observer. I noticed that he had on his table a compilation of fliers and other literature I had posted on bulletin boards around town to advertise my workshops and services; there had clearly been planning involved in the event.
     The conference leader acted confused and surprised that I had not been told I was to be the guest speaker. I glanced at the man who had invited me—the husband of a client—and the grin on his face made it clear that he was enjoying the situation. (I later realized that he resented the work I had been doing with his then-wife and that this was a form of retaliation meant to lower me in his wife’s estimation.)
     They invited me to give a demonstration of my trancework. I explained to them, essentially, that I was an agnostic spiritualist—that I did not know anything for sure about the existence of the paranormal—and I informed the group that I told my clients that I did not speak from any spiritual “authority.” A woman politely asked me if she could take my pulse as I did my trance; I told her I did not like being touched when I was in trance. Another woman asked me if my psychic abilities were proven to be imaginary, would I be willing to give up my career as a psychic? My honest answer was, “I hope I would have the courage to do so.”
     I attempted a demonstration, and it was a complete disaster. I felt surrounded by a 6 foot high, 6 foot thick, impenetrable wall. Absolutely no impressions of any kind reached me until the very end of the session, when I picked up a few mini-“hits” about two of the men in the audience. One set of impressions I received spontaneously, about a man’s popularity with his young students; the other set of impressions came as a response to a question that later proved to be a complete fabrication. At one point I saw an elderly man at the back of the audience staring at me, and the look on his face was pure unmitigated contempt. When I was done, I saw the delighted looks on the faces of a number of the audience members, and it was clear that I was not in a skeptics group, but in a debunkers group, and that they had gotten the experience they desired.
     After the meeting I was ignored by everyone in the group, and left quietly. A week or so later one of the audience members interviewed me privately, and although he was very polite, it was clear from the questions he asked, and the details he dropped about himself, that he was a conservative Catholic who believed that spiritual guides were Satanic deceivers promoting humanism above the revealed doctrines of the Church. Later he wrote a letter to the local paper claiming “Rand Lee may be the only honest psychic in Santa Fe,” a reference I believe to my hope that I would have the courage to quit my profession if proven a fake–and though some might take this as damning with faint praise, it did console me a trifle that at least one person at the conference did not believe I was a charlatan, just self-deluded.
     It took me many years to regain my confidence in my abilities. But I learned from this experience that (1) when I am in an altered psycho-receptive state my critical analytical faculties are offline, and I am unable to detect when I am being conned or lied to; (2) that I cannot read through my own fears—I must feel safe in order to relax and get objective impressions of my audiences; (3) that I cannot read people who do not wish to be read; and (4) that I have the right to say “No” to any situation aimed at humiliating me. I see now that I should have refused to give a demonstration at that meeting, and called out the man who invited me for his act of passive aggression. Not to have done so was, I fear, foolish. I regret that decision to this day.
—October 2, 2017
I’ve recently come across a very enlightening website that addresses the issue of honest skepticism vs. the current fashion in verbally abusive online pseudoskepticism. The site is http://www.skepticalaboutskeptics.org.