Do You Believe In Fairies? Clap Your Hands

Spoiler Alert: Last night, on Netflix, I watched a British film called “Hippopotamus”. The main character and narrator is a  late middle aged British critic whose sardonic skepticism is equaled only by his sense of personal failure and self-loathing. In the film, he is called to an aristocratic country home to investigate rumors that a younger son there—the critic’s godson—has developed supernatural healing abilities. A man, a horse, and several women have been reported as cured of life-threatening illnesses when the boy laid hands upon them.

“Hippopotamus” is well scripted and well acted. The main character’s acerbic wit both appeals and appalls. But the ending is predictable. The critic—a former poet plagued with writer’s block for decades—unmasks the “healings” as a con on the part of the boy: one of the women dies, and the others’ symptoms return, except for the horse’s, who turns out to have been suffering from nothing worse than a hangover brought on by lapping up an alcoholic beverage accidentally dumped into its water bucket by the critic.

There is a happy ending of sorts: the boy admits to the con; is reconciled with his father, whom the con had been designed to impress; the critic’s writer’s block dissolves; and he starts making poems again. But the underlying assumptions of the film are what I’ve come to expect from modern secular media: there is no God; “miracles” are simply chance occurrences explicable by natural law; and anyone who believes in God, the supernatural, faith, or life after death is a self-deluded lamebrain.

True confession time: The movie depressed me. Against all experience and true expectation, I had deep down hoped that the main character would at least have been left with some doubts about the certitude of his materialism. When the hope was dashed, my ancient doubts concerning the true nature of my own mystical and psychic experiences rose up chattering. This is nothing new—my mind has always been a house divided, rationalist on one side, mystic on the other—and when such dark moods descend on me, I feel like a charlatan who has wasted his life living in a dream world.

Oddly enough, when I go into trance, or throw the cards for a client, or am in the presence of others who have had mystical experiences, my doubts recede, and the quiet joy of knowing that Divine Love is real, and that we are all,  ultimately, safe, returns.  But when I am alone in my flat, at night, it is more difficult to recapture that startling sense of peace I experience in the day.

This dualism is in part inherited: My father was an agnostic and purported rationalist; my mother, a high church Episcopalian who taught me from an early age “If I should die before I wake, I pray my Lord my soul to take.” I always felt torn between them, to the point where, as a child, I taught myself to sleep on my back rather than on my left or right side, because Daddy slept on the left side of the bed he shared with Mommy, and Mommy slept on the right side, and I felt if I chose right or left I would be siding with one parent against the other.

Tonight, as I lay in bed suffocating beneath the dread that the materialists are right, and that my mystic experiences are nothing more than brain farts, I could understand how some people believe in demon oppression or soulsucking negative thoughtform attacks—because I felt attacked, not by demons, but by the overwhelmingly pessimistic materialism of modern secular intellectual culture. And the thought came to me: You don’t have to give in to these doubts. You have a choice, based upon your experience, to believe in spirit guides, nature spirits, ghosts, reincarnation, soul travel, ESP, Tarot, channeling, and other manifestations of nonlinear consciousness, or not to believe in them. Which choice makes your life run more smoothly while not violating either your reason or your intuition? Choose now.

My lifelong difficulty reconciling my father’s agnosticism with my mother’s emotional religiosity was predicted, many years ago, when I was a sophomore at St. John’s College in Annapolis, Maryland. I developed a crush on a bisexual upperclassman who dabbled in the occult, inspired by the characters in John Fowles’ The Magus. One day, while in a pot-fueled trance, he predicted that I would spend my life standing on the crossroads showing the way for others to follow, while never taking that path myself.

Tonight I say: I choose to believe that life is more than a molecular dance, wondrous though that dance may be. Tonight I choose to believe that Spirit is real, and that my experiences of It are glimpses of a truth underlying, upholding, and surrounding the truths of physical reality. To put it another way, words deliberately chosen to irritate the the sophisticated atheist who lives inside me: tonight I choose to believe in fairies. And if you choose to believe in them, too? Why, do what Peter Pan invited us to do when Tinker Bell lay at death’s door. If you believe in fairies, clap your hands. •

 

A Message From “The Family”: On The Beloved Dead

Victorian_seance[On January 27, 1988, I walked into my love Stuart’s bedroom and found him dead on the bed. He and I had been lovers for only 2 years. We worked as psychics together in Key West, Florida and Santa Fe, New Mexico; we met originally when he came to me seeking Louise Hay-type guided meditations for boosting his immune system. One day, during such a meditation (which he claimed did indeed make him feel better), Stuart manifested a feminine information source he called “Alexandra” whose calm, understated manner was a stark contrast to his Aries exuberance.

[About a month before he died, Stuart—who was suffering from AIDS symptoms at a time before the current, longevity promoting, AIDS “cocktail” of meds had been developed— told me that he had dreamed he was in a coma in hospital, and that I was sitting beside his bed. He said that in the dream, I understood that it was so beautiful where he went when he was in deep trance, that someday he would not come back from there, and that I was OK with it. When I found his body that morning in 1988, I realized then that his account of his “dream” had been his way of letting me know he was planning to kill himself with a heavy injection of painkiller that he had been hoarding since his job as a med tech at Key West Island Hospital.

[The following channeling discusses my experiences regarding Stuart since his passing. -RL]

When Mister Rand first walked into the room where he found his lover’s body, he had no sooner set eyes upon Stuart’s prone form than he felt, floating somewhere near the ceiling on the lefthand side of the bedroom, two energies or consciousnesses. One of the consciousnesses was in fact that of Stuart, Rand’s lover; the other, that of the so-called “channeled entity” that 2 years previously had, at its first appearance, announced its name as “Alexandra”.

Now “Alexandra” was the feminine persona of the channeler, Stuart. In a sense, Mister Rand feels she is still present in his life; at other times she seems a very distant memory. Stuart himself feels to Mister Rand even more distant. Mister Rand’s younger brother, Jeffrey Robert Lee, died in 1990 from AIDS; his consciousness, by contrast with Stuart’s, seems much more present in Mister Rand’s life, particularly when Mister Rand is channeling or doing psychic readings for clients.

Why do some dead feel more present to us than others? The answers in part depend upon our ultimate view of reality. An atheist-materialist-ethicist [might] say that the memories of the dead, not the dead themselves, are present with us in direct proportion to how willing we have been to release those relationships and move on to new ones in physical reality—in other words, the more emotionally attached you are to the memory of your dead friend or relative, the more present they will seem to be. By contrast, a spiritualist might say that some dead feel more present to us than others because some of our dead have been willing to “move on”—detach from identification with their former self, former life, and former acquaintances (us)—and others of our dead have not.

We see the situation as possessing elements of both explanations. Let us say that Mister Yiffniff dies. At first, depending upon his spiritual practises in the life just ended, Yiffniff [may be] a bit disoriented; he may even feel that his death is a mistake, that he has so much “unfinished business” to attend to before he is ready to depart fully. Other, less conflicted individuals, may be ready to “move on” immediately—may be even glad that they have died, for now, if they wish, they can take on a new physical form in a new place or position in spacetime. Still other beloved dead may select to remain focused in our physical plane in order to keep watch over the physically living—to act, in a sense, as spirit guides to those whom they have loved and still do love. Mister Jeffrey, Mister Rand’s baby brother, is just such a one—committed,  as it were, to stay by Mister Rand’s side until it is time for them to become balls of joyous light together. Each case is different, however, and must be evaluated as objectively as possible by the psychic researcher. •

A Message From “The Family”: On Human Goodness

Jeffrey Robert Lee (L); Rand Benjamin Lee (R)

Jeffrey Robert Lee (L); Rand Benjamin Lee (R)

Mister Rand has found himself deeply upset by the carnage in Florida’s gay and Lesbian nightclub, the club in which half a hundred individuals lost their physical bodies to bullets and many more were traumatized. Understand that evil is an act, not a condition; that one can say, out of rage and fear, that so-and-so is evil to have done such a terrible thing unmoved, but at root humans still are good, as all things at root are good; i.e., worthy of existing, for they have been born from the womb of God and return to it at death.

Why, then, does evil take place? It is possible to reduce one’s consciousness to a level so uncreative and closed to the value of others that one achieves a consciousness level we call To Control Absolutely, the least creative and least loving of all consciousness levels. While To Control Absolutely is no longer a level of consciousness sanctioned by the mass will of humanity as a normative attitude, nonetheless certain individuals, spurred on by fear of victimization by others, are trapped in the attitude that tells them, “The only way you will be safe is to control everyone and everything around you at all times.”

At this consciousness level, one sees everyone and everything one encounters as a character in one’s private play; a tool to use for one’s sensory and physical gratification and safety.Particularly if there is something in oneself that mirrors an attribute in the other, one may wish to harm or even kill the other as a symbolic means of harming or killing the trait within oneself that one loathes.

Many individuals speak with disapproval of how the media glorifies mass killers and similar criminals by devoting seemingly endless coverage to them. Many individuals feel that by doing so, the media encourages other individuals to commit atrocities so that they will enjoy worldwide fame, too. In certain cases this is indeed the effect that media obsession with individual criminals exerts. There is also in our view a sexual component to human interest in death: not only the desire to penetrate (with penis, bullet, etc.) and change forever the one penetrated (through unwanted pregnancy, through destruction of the victim’s mental health, through the victim’s death), but also the desire to feel godlike—to feel that one has the supreme power to bypass all moral systems and commit acts of devastation that will forever draw attention to one’s Self. These yearnings are all connected with the consciousness levels of To Control Absolutely and, to a lesser extent, of To Force.

Why does God allow acts of atrocity? We have no general answer to this. Some acts of atrocity are due to “natural” causes: geographic upheaval, weather, “accident,” and disease. Mister Rand’s brother Jeffrey died of AIDS in 1990, a virus he contracted in Key West, Florida during his time there. This was a very spiritually evolved individual who helped introduce Mister Rand to spiritualism, yet he died at age 35 a year after his beloved dog died. Mister Rand has since dreamed of him joyous and free, and has come to realize that Mister Jeffrey and their mother Kaye had business between them to complete, business that Mister Jeffrey chose to pursue by staying in Ireland and caring for her, even though, about a year before [his death], he predicted to a family friend that his mother “would be the death of” him. (Ireland had few resources at the time for caring for persons living with AIDS, and the medications now available that assist persons with AIDS to live longer did not then exist.) And of course many other deaths from disease, car accident, accident and so forth take place every minute of the human day, and to those experiencing them, or to those loving the victims of these situations, these losses can be unconsolable. If a God of Love existed, why would She permit any creature to suffer at all for any reason? All that we know is, each situation with each individual person must be taken individually for it to be understood.

Mister Rand is horrified by this statement. Are we saying, he asks, that some individuals choose [before they are born] to die horribly in the life to come, or deserve to die horribly because of bad things they have done in this life or a past life? No wonder there are angry atheists in the world, Mister Rand says, with so many religions trying to come up with excuses for why their deities have permitted evil to flourish. To this we say, the gods Mister Rand speaks of do not know pain. They do not know helplessness. They do not know victimization. In their level of reality, only love exists. To them, death is simply the walking through of a door, or an awakening from dreams. The only beings who can know what it is like to die are beings with physical bodies. And one of the reasons for incarnation is to bring the power of Love to bear against the consciousness levels of To Control Absolutely, To Force, To Threaten, and To Blame, the consciousness levels that give rise to Dachau, and Orlando, and the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire. The purpose of incarnation is the integration of Love consciousness with the mechanisms of the physical universe, so that reason and intuition, fueled by compassion, can soften spacetime’s hard edges.

For you are Good. You are Good. You are Good.•

— Channeled 6/25/16 by Rand B. Lee. All rights reserved. “The Family” is a nonhierarchical, nonauthoritarian secondary persona of  Mister Rand, created by him to convey information he cannot access readily via his conscious mind. See sidebar for  contact information.

A Message From “The Family”: On the Purpose of Life

MAJORTRUMPS.XVII.TheWorldPhysical reality has no purpose save that of being itself. Processes of birth and death, burgeoning and decay, health and sickness, flow and ebb, all are descriptions of the energy transfers and formations that makes physical reality distinctive. They possess no intrinsic moral qualities; they are tools for experience. And it is the various levels of consciousness that determine whether those experiences are expansive, leading to greater and greater sense of creativity, love, and peacefulness, or whether those experiences are restrictive, leading to greater and greater sense of entrapment, hatred, horror, and violation.

Mister Rand finds it inconceivable that any spiritual consciousness entity would select horror and violation as experiences it wished to have in physical reality. Yet we assure you that some beings choose just that in their Greater Selves, for many nonphysical entities possess a passion for differentiation so acute that it leads them to the consciousness levels of force, threat, and blame, which taken together offer the greatest opportunity for enjoying the illusion that one is distinct, unique, alone, inviolate, empty of purpose and meaning.

Mister Rand asks, “Is there no moral core to All-That-Is, that such choices are permitted without consequences?” We reply with love that it is because All-That-Is possesses a moral core of unconditional loving support that such choices are permitted. For when All-That-Is, or the Greatest Self, or the One, or God, or Goddess, or whatever you choose to term It gave birth to Itself in Its search for expanding Its experience of Its infinite potential, It elected to permit Its “littler” selves (to use a term that has no literal meaning in the nonphysical realities) freedom to explore experience according to their individual choices. The serendipitous experiences arising from such freedoms are the meat and drink of the incarnating soul.

“How is it,” asks Mister Rand, “that God can be simultaneously the Unmoved Mover, the absolute field of loving consciousness I experienced a year and a half ago in my vision as complete in itself, [while at the same time being] the questing Entity which seeks to expand Its experience of Itself through the choices and actions of its self-aware, mobile selves [i.e., you and we, who carry within us a hologram of All-That-Is, which is what the Bible refers to when it says that God made Man and Woman in “His” image]?” And to this we have no reply.

MAJORTRUMPS.VII.PanWhat, then, is the purpose of life? As we see it from our observations and experiences, the purpose of life is to experience and experiment with potential, whether one speaks of a human being’s individual potential for career or creative outlet or self-definition or experience, or whether one speaks of an ecosystem or species’ potential for change. In short, God likes being surprised. That is how evolution—a [truly] chance development of forms into greater and greater degrees of complexity—can exist alongside the existence of divine consciousness. Chance is one of the faces of the Goddess, as represented in Mister Rand’s Tarot system by the Major Trump he calls “Pan.”

Pan is frightening, because to hear Pan’s call is to waken to one’s chaotic, chance-driven, boiling potential for self-expression and change. Pan is seductive, because within each entity is a passion for collision, melding, separation, burgeoning, love, hate, joy, and despair. Pan is physical reality with all its apparent rigidity of structure, which when viewed on the subatomic level is the reverse of rigid: fluid, empty, racing, dispersive, connotative rather than descriptive—physical reality as an event, a constantly changing work of art, a poem, a paean, a trick that All-That-Is is playing upon Itself.

And you, Mister Rand, the animals, the plants, the electrons, the magnetosphere, light and Void, all of us are the originators and perpetrators of the drama of spacetime. By “drama” we do not mean to trivialize physical experience; quite the reverse. A drama is a story, and we are all hungry for stories. And we thank you for sharing. •

— Channeled by Rand Lee on Tuesday, June 16th, 11:59pm MT.

A Message From “The Family”: On Reincarnation

On the subject of reincarnation there are many views, and the views we express herein are not meant to be interpreted as Truth for all beings. Take what feels right and leave the rest. But it is our observation and experience from our vantage point both in the nonphysical and physical that religious or philosophical systems that attempt to exclude certain experiences of the unseen as valid and others as invalid are seldom religions or philosophical systems that remain in the long term without change. So we discuss here the doctrine of reincarnation.

As commonly stated in American New Age circles, reincarnation is the teaching that souls live many lives in order to work on spiritual, emotional, or physical issues that are keeping them from full awareness of their perfection and divine natures. These many lives are often spoken of as sequential: that is, taking place one after another according to linear timescales. So MAJORTRUMPS.X.TheWheelofFortuneearlier and later are terms applied to incarnational experiences: i.e., Sister Susan was a sea captain in 1722; then she was a satellite technician in 1967; one day she will be a pot farmer on a space station in 2341. From our viewpoint, this view of incarnation is limited by its emphasis on linearity. From the point of view of the Greater Self, the aspect of the incarnated self that is fully conscious of its divinity, all incarnations appear simultaneous, like beads on a string, whether they be past, present, or future from the linear human viewpoint.

And past, present, and future are not the only frameworks for incarnation. Parallel universes exist where events transpire differently than they transpire in the universe where Mr Rand is channeling these words, and a soul can incarnate as readily in such parallel universes as it can in the one with whim Mr Rand is currently familiar. So from this viewpoint, Sister Susan is simultaneously a physician serving a hospital in an America where the War Between the States never took place and slavery has persisted into the 21st Century. She may also be, in a different life, a police officer gunned down in a[n anti-semitic] “race” riot in a U.S.A. dominated by Nazi Germany; and a beggar in a U.S.A. reduced to a radioactive shambles in the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Souls can also incarnate in the same universe in such a way that their lives intersect briefly. Mister Rand’s partner Mister Alex Lucker years ago met a young man who was Alex in a different incarnation. Alex and he felt a connection, and attempted to date, but each time they got together they found themselves literally incapable of interaction: at a movie theatre, the young man instantly went to sleep at the start of the film and did not awaken until it was over; at a restaurant, the waitperson brought the young man and Alex menus, and the next thing Mister Alex knew, she was standing there by the table with a frown on her face saying, “Is there something wrong? You two have just been sitting there silently for twenty minutes.” So Mister Alex and the young man gave up attempting to date, and Mister Alex drew the conclusion from this that a soul who meets [a previous or future self] in the same universe in the same time period is generally speaking unable to interact in any way creative enough to generate expansive experience. And this is, we believe, the case.

Souls can also incarnate as nonhumans. Mister Alex once channeled that animals are natives to physical reality, spiritually, emotionally, and physically at home here, so human souls, who are at home in a level of reality we call The Plane of Light and Sound, cannot take on animal bodies as such, but rather “hitchhike” psychically in an animal’s soul if they wish to experience life from an animal’s viewpoint. Souls can also incarnate as sentient self-aware beings dwelling not in the Sol System where Earth is located but other star systems hundreds, thousands, even millions of light years distant physically from Earth. In such cases, memories of these extraterrestrial incarnations may be difficult to access, particularly if the species in which one incarnates has a brain and mind structure very very different from the human. But some “alien abduction” trauma memories are in fact distorted memories not of aliens kidnapping the human and taking him or her away to experiment on, but the reverse: they are distorted memories of the decision of a nonhuman soul to leave its familiar extraterrestrial context and incarnate as Homo sapiens for a lifetime—an often traumatic experience for that nonhuman soul.

In other words, reincarnation is not mandated, but optional, and it can take many different forms. It is the Greater Self who chooses that a soul reincarnate or not. There are some souls that never reincarnate, but [after one or two incarnations] are content to expand their experience via creative expression in the nonphysical realms. Often such souls enter physical reality in the first place mainly because the mass consciousness has requested their presence there for a specific purpose. That purpose fulfilled, the mass consciousness no longer requires their presence, so the souls return to their native country, which is made of consciousness rather than matter.

Mister Rand is anxious that we do not alienate any readers who belong to religions in which reincarnation is a mandated experience or in which reincarnation is considered a fantasy or myth. Beliefs and belief systems exist to assist a soul in experiencing the world from a viewpoint shaped by the belief system. So atheism is as valid a belief system as theism; the atheist is an atheist partly because s/he requires certain experiences that only being an atheist can give him or her. And it is the same with the soul incarnated as a Fundamentalist Christian, or radical Muslim, or Buddhist nun, and so forth.

And we thank you for sharing. •

— Channeled Thursday, May 14, 2015 by Rand B. Lee.