A Message From “The Family”: On the Purpose of Things

MAJORTRUMPS.IX.TheFinalJudgmentIn the world of Thought, there is constant change. Thought forms are born, swell into importance, leave stains on the fabric of reality owing to the passions fueling them, and subside, becoming whispers on the winds that blow continually through the mental worlds of the  astral plane. Nobody asks, “What is the purpose of thoughts?” Thoughts come and go, arise and subside, give birth to other thoughts or to suspension thereof; Thought just is. Why, then, when speaking of  life in physical reality, do individuals seek obsessively for the purpose of such life? Is it not enough that  Life simply is; that seasons, like thought-forms, come and go; that love, death, birth, marriage, sickness, recovery, travel, fellowship, and creative endeavours simply arise and fall like waves of the ocean.

“Why am I here?” is one of Humanity’s great agonized cries. Yet as we see it from the Plane of Light and Sound, asking, “What is my life purpose?” is as meaningless as  “What is the purpose of the color blue?” Blue just is, that is all; life just is. That is to say, life is intrinsically valuable. It does not need a purpose, goal, or achievement to give it meaning and worth.

Mister Rand’s father was a world famous novelist at one point in human history. It is not what he set out to become, and he is virtually forgotten in America today. As we see things, what is important is not whether Mister Rand’s father had a great effect on human history, although in fact his work continues to resonate throughout the subgenre of literary entertainments known as crime fiction; but whether Mister Rand’s father enjoyed the experience. For it is the experience of hardness, softness, cold, heat, excitement, ennui, hate, love, redness, purpleness, travel, imprisonment that gives life its meaning and purpose.

By this thinking, therefore, there can be no such thing as failure. Mister Rand has frequently felt like a failure because he has not succeeded in becoming a famous writer like his father (he gives us permission to write this here, though he is not particularly happy about our having done so). But that very internal experience of self-disappointment, self-comparison, and self-appraisal is intrinsically valuable, because experience is growth, and growth is what all life seeks to embrace, whether in physical reality, thought reality, the physical planning state, the dream state, the nonphysical planning state, the plane of light and sound, the plane of the greater self, or the plane of the One.

“Why should the experience of growth be more valuable to the One,” asks Mister Rand, “than the experience of non-growth?” He asks this in order to make trouble for us <laughter>. All we can reply is, “Because it is.”

And we thank you for sharing. •

 

3 thoughts on “A Message From “The Family”: On the Purpose of Things

  1. Sarah Caldwell says:

    What a wonderful and precious message. So happy to have it.

    Sarah

    >

    Like

  2. Thoughtful well- written post as usual. It sounds like Buddhism. I used to need to believe that their was a purpose by God for my existence, but I am okay with being alive like a flower is with no reason other than its job of being a flower. Others can place their meaning for what is the purpose of that flower.

    Like

  3. Kathleen says:

    Thanks. Rand. I love it!!!

    Like

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